Health Sciences Public Relations & Marketing

Office of Public Relations and Marketing

The Health Sciences Public Relations and Marketing Office provides connections between Keck School physicians and scientists and the public by working with the news media, and by directly publicizing new research, campus events and happenings and Keck patient care programs. We also produce insightful, award-winning publications and manage special events for the Keck School of Medicine and Keck Medical Center of USC.

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Featured News

Mark Humayun named inaugural director of the USC Eye Institute

Mark Humayun, MD, PhD, internationally known for his work on the Argus II artificial retina implant intended to restore sight to the blind, has been named the inaugural director of the USC Eye Institute.

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  • Keck Medical Center of USC becomes only worldwide training center for da Vinci Xi robotic-assisted thoracic surgery

    Surgeons at the Keck Medical Center of USC this summer became the first in Southern California and among the first west of the Mississippi to perform the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved robotic-assisted procedure for a lung cancer patient using the latest, minimally invasive surgical system, the da Vinci Xi robot.

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  • USC Eye Institute study shows Native American ancestry significant risk factor for diabetic eye disease in Latinos

    New research led by the USC Eye Institute, part of Keck Medicine of USC, shows for the first time that Native American ancestry is a significant risk factor for vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy among Latinos with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in the United States, affecting more than 4 million Americans age 40 and older.

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  • USC stem cell PhD students present their blueprints for rebuilding the body

    The students in the new PhD program in Development, Stem Cells, and Regenerative Medicine recently presented some ideas that would give Dr. Frankenstein a run for his money. For the summer course DSR 542 Principles of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, eight teams of students presented elevator pitches and scientific posters outlining strategies for rebuilding the body’s organ systems.

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  • White Coat Ceremony inaugurates students as physicians

    For 187 fresh-faced new medical students from the Keck School of Medicine of USC’s Class of 2018, the act of putting on a white coat signified the beginning of their lives as health-care professionals. At a ceremony held on Aug. 15, 2014 in the Harry & Celesta Pappas Quad, these students received their white coats from faculty leaders to symbolize the trust placed in them by the public.

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  • USC Eye Institute study finds African-Americans at higher risk for diabetic vision loss

    Research by Keck Medicine of USC ophthalmology scientists demonstrates that African-Americans bear heavier burden of diabetic macular edema (DME), one of the leading causes of blindness in diabetic patients in the United States.

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  • USC offers a summer of stem cells for local high school students

    Twenty-three local high school students spent their summer vacations in a very unusual place: the Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC. This August, these students celebrated their graduations from the USC Early Investigator High School (EiHS) and the USC CIRM Science, Technology and Research (STAR) programs.

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  • Request for proposals: Eli and Edythe Broad Innovation Award

    A recent gift from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation established the Eli and Edythe Broad Innovation Awards at USC. An annual research grant of $120,000 will be awarded to one innovative, multi-­investigator proposal that broadly advances the goals of USC Stem Cell. We anticipate five awards over the next five years. Personnel other than principal investigators (PIs), supplies and minor equipment up to $10,000 are eligible for funding.

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Featured Expert

John Lipham, MD
Chief, Division of Upper GI and General Surgery
Associate Professor of Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of USC

Expertise:
• GERD
• Esophageal cancer
• Foregut surgery

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USC Health Sciences Source Alert:

During the holiday season, heartburn can quickly put a damper on festivities like familly get-togethers and tailgate parties. While people commonly experience occasional heartburn, more than 15 million Americans suffer symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) every day, according to the American College of Gastroenterology. In recognition of the 15th Annual GERD Awareness Week, Nov. 24-30, Keck Medicine of USC physicians are available to discuss simple tips to help reduce GERD symptoms during the holiday season as well as novel treatments for the disease.

Caroline Hwang, MD, is a gastroenterologist and assistant professor of clinical medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. She can discuss general strategies to minimize heartburn and other GERD symptoms. "There are many things people can do to prevent GERD flare-ups, but on Thanksgiving remember to season lightly, slow down and stay awake," Hwang said. "Spicy foods, physical exertion and lying down after a meal can all aggravate GERD symptoms."

John Lipham, MD, is associate professor of surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and chief of the division of upper gastrointestinal and general surgery. He specializes in the treatment and study of benign and malignant diseases of the esophagus and stomach. He led clinical investigation at USC of the LINX Reflux Management System, an FDA-approved device that treats GERD through minimally invasive surgery, and has successfully implanted more than 100 of those devices in people since 2009, the highest volume of experience with the LINX in the Western United States. “This device is a huge advance for the treatment of reflux, which affects millions of people in the U.S.,” Lipham said. “It addresses a gap of patients who suffer from GERD but no longer respond well to medication treatment.”

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