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Keck Medicine in the News: Jan. 29 - Feb. 4, 2013

Keck Medicine in the News

Keck Medicine in the News is a weekly digest of recent news stories highlighting medical news and faculty mentions of the Keck School of Medicine of USC and Keck Medical Center of USC.  For more information, or to share a news story to be included, please call (323) 442-2830.

By USC Health Sciences Public Relations and Marketing

A Feb. 4 broadcast on KPCC-FM featured an interview with Daniel Arkfeld, assistant professor of medicine at the Keck School of Medicine, about rheumatoid arthritis. "I think it's important to understand that rheumatoid arthritis comes from the blood," Arkfeld said. "The disease doesn't start in the joints; it's really in the blood."

A Feb. 4 report in Science Codex featured research led by Weiming Yuan, assistant professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Keck School of Medicine, that describes a new breed of mouse that possesses an immune response more like a human's. The research also was covered by Medical Xpress and Health Canal.

A Feb. 4 article in VOXXI cited a 2008 study led by Michael Goran, who holds the Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Endowed Chair in childhood obesity and diabetes and is professor of preventive medicine, physiology & biophysics and pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine, finding that overweight Hispanic children are at significant risk for pre-diabetes.

A Feb. 1 article by HealthDay News quoted Sean Nordt, assistant professor of clinical emergency medicine of the Keck School of Medicine, about the dangers that energy drinks pose to teenagers.

A Feb. 1 column in The Huffington Post quoted Robert Kloner, professor of medicine at the Keck School of Medicine, about his research that links the emotional stress experienced by fans of a losing Super Bowl team could increase the risk of heart attack.

A Jan. 31 broadcast on American Public Media's "Marketplace" quoted David Agus, professor of medicine at the Keck School of Medicine, about cancer screening. "Countries that screen [for prostate cancer] have half the death rate of countries that don’t," Agus said. "In the United States, since we started screening, the death rate is down over 45 percent."

The Jan. 31 edition of The Desert Sun featured an article by Kevan Craig, assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine, about a Children's Hospital Los Angeles patient's recovery after a near-fatal hit-and-run accident.

A Jan. 31 column in The New York Times published SAT study strategies by Keck School of Medicine student Shaan Patel, who is the author of “SAT 2400 in Just 7 Steps.”

A Jan. 30 broadcast on KCET-TV’s “SoCal Connected” interviewed Sean Nordt, assistant professor of clinical emergency medicine of the Keck School of Medicine, about the dangers of designer drugs called "bath salts."

A Jan. 28 article in The Plain Dealer featured research by Wei-An “Andy” Lee, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the Keck School of Medicine, on how geospatial video can help inform patients at his urban clinic in Los Angeles. Using geospatial maps, doctors can learn what a patient’s immediate neighborhood is like, and then make healthful recommendations based on that information. “Along with a patient’s medical and family history, what I’d like to see is your spatial history,” Lee said. “By looking at that throughout time, how does that influence your health?” Andrew Curtis, now at Kent State University, also conducted research in this area while he was a USC faculty member.

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