About the Massry Prize

The Massry Prize

The Meira and Shaul G. Massry Foundation established the Massry Prize in 1996 to recognize outstanding contributions to the biomedical sciences and the advancement of health.

Founded by Dr. Shaul Massry, professor emeritus of medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the nonprofit foundation promotes education and research in nephrology, physiology, and related fields.

The Massry Prize includes a substantial honorarium and twelve of its recipients have gone on to receive the Nobel Prize.

Each year a scientific theme is chosen by the Foundation. The laureates are then selected by a committee of distinguished professors representing both the University of Southern California (USC) and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Beverly Hills City Hall, Site of the annual  Massry Prize Award Ceremony
The Massry Prize is awarded in the context of a three day series of events. On Thursday of the award week, the laureates spend the day at USC meeting with faculty members, students, and postdocs. During this visit, they deliver a lecture on the science for which they have been honored. This is repeated the next day at UCLA. On Saturday morning, a formal awards ceremony is held at the Beverly Hills Town Hall.

The USC Institute for Genetic Medicine is proud to host the annual Massry Prize activities at USC.

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