Team CAMM

Team CAMM



Dr. David Agus
David Agus, MD
(310) 272-7640 - Office
(310) 272-7656 - Fax
Agus@usc.edu

David Agus, MD
Dr. Agus is Director of the CAMM and USC Westside Cancer Center and an internationally recognized investigator in the field of genitourinary cancers. Dr. Agus' research has focused on the the factors influencing the development and progression of prostate cancer. In addition, Dr. Agus is conducting research focused on understanding the biology of cancer and the development of new therapeutics for prostate cancer. His laboratory has made important contributions regarding the Her-kinase axis and related therapeutics. In addition, Dr. Agus is leading a variety of clinical trials Prostate Cancer and other diseases. Dr. Agus graduated cum laude with honors in molecular biology from Princeton University, and received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He completed his medical internship and residency training at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Dr. Gross Agus
Mitchell Gross, MD, PhD
(310) 272-7640 - Office
(310) 272-7656 - Fax
mitchell.gross@med.usc.edu

Mitchell Gross, MD, PhD
Dr. Gross is the Research Director of the USC Westside Cancer Center and the Center for Applied Molecular Medicine and Associate Professor of Medicine and Urology at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. His research interest focuses on applying modern techniques relating to the study of genes and proteins (genomics and proteomics) on the clinical problems faced in treating cancer patients. A particular interest is to understand and apply new findings and therapies related to the androgen receptor (male hormones) and related proteins and pathways as treatment for prostate cancer. As a medical oncologist, his clinical activities are focused on clinical trials incorporating both molecularly targeted and conventional therapies to the care of cancer patients.

Dr. Gross has earned degrees from the University of California, San Diego (B.A.), Baylor College of Medicine in Houston (M.D.), and the University of California, Los Angeles (Ph.D. Molecular Biology). He completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in hematology and medical oncology at the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. Among the many academic honors awarded to Dr. Gross, he is particularly distinguished with membership in the Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Omega Alpha honor societies. His research has been published in major biomedical research journals including Blood, Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, Oncogene, Clinical Cancer Research, among others.


Lisa Flashner
(310) 272-7640 - Office
(310) 272-7656 - Fax
Lisa.Flashner@med.usc.edu

Lisa Flashner
Lisa Flashner is the Chief Operating Officer of the USC Center for Applied Molecular Medicine and the USC Westside Cancer Center. Her responsibilities include the financial and business operations of the group as well as personnel related matters and donor relations. She received a B. S. in accounting from the University of Illinois, a law degree magna cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center, and is a certified public accountant. Prior to joining USC, she was a partner at the Pritzker Venture Capital Group, a venture capital firm focused on investments in early stage technology companies. She joined Pritzker Ventures from the investment banking group at Robert W. Baird & Co., where she was a lead banker in the information technology and telecommunications industry. Prior to her work in investment banking, Lisa practiced corporate law and was a tax accountant at Arthur Anderson & Co.

Dr. Kani
Kian Kani
(323) 442-2531 - Office
(323) 442-2764 - Fax
kani@usc.edu

Kian Kani
Cancer has been traditionally classified based on the organ site of origin; breast cancer is different from prostate cancer which is distinct from lung cancer and so on. Over the past several years however, cancer research has introduced reclassification of tumors based on the signaling pathway(s) that causes malignant transformation. As a result, medical oncologists can prescribe drugs that specifically target the aberrant signaling pathway irrespective of the location of the tumor. Modern cancer therapeutics have therefore become “targeted” rather than “systemic.” This has brought upon a significant paradigm shift in medical treatment decisions and spurred oncology research to identify biomarkers indicative of signaling pathway activation. The Kani research group utilizes state-of-the-art proteomic techniques in order to identify and characterize novel cancer biomarkers. Our work focuses on the androgen receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor signaling axes in prostate, lung, breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers. Our goal is to enhance patient outcome by empowering medical oncologist with tools and knowledge necessary for personalized medicine. Dr. Kani may be reached via email Kani@usc.edu , LinkedIn, or Twitter.

Dr. Jonathan Katz
Jonathan Katz
(323) 442-2580 - Phone
(323) 442-3849 - Fax
katzj@usc.edu

Jonathan Katz
Dr. Jonathan Katz is Director of Operations and with the CAMM. Dr. Katz' primary research focus has been in developing and implementing techniques to produce molecular profiles from biological samples. Using his experience with Fourier-transform mass spectrometry, complex sample processing and molecular profiling, he has developed high-throughput techniques that produce informative, very high resolution, multidimensional mass spectral profiles. He, along with the team at Cedars-Sinai as well as off-campus collaborators, have been developing techniques to interrogate these profiles in order to discover molecular fingerprints of biological state, clinical outcome and underlying biochemical processes.

Dr. Macklin
Paul Macklin
(323) 442-2764 - Fax
Email Preferred: Paul.macklin@usc.edu MathCancer.org

Paul Macklin
Dr. Macklin is an applied mathematician and Assistant Professor of Research Medicine at CAMM. He is part of the USC-led Physical Sciences in Oncology Center (PSOC), is Co-Director of the Consortium for Integrative Computational Oncology (CICO), and holds appointments at the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Macklin and his lab work in tightly-integrated teams of clinicians, modelers, and biologists to develop and validate sophisticated computational models of cancer in individual patients. He hopes that these computational tools will one day help accelerate biological discovery and assist clinicians and their patients in making treatment decisions. Dr. Macklin regularly involves undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students to help train the next generation of multidisciplinary cancer scientists.

Dr. Parag Mallick
Parag Mallick
(323) 442-3849 - Fax
Mallick@usc.edu

Parag Mallick
Dr. Mallick's primary appointment is as Director of Clinical Proteomics at the CAMM. In addition, he is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Mallick received his undergraduate degree in Computer Science and Biochemistry from Washington University in St. Louis, and his graduate degree with David Eisenberg at UCLA. His postdoctoral research, with Ruedi Aebersold at the Institute for Systems Biology, focused on quantitative and clinical proteomics. His current research interests focus on development of tools for quantitative, proteome-scale analyses of protein structure and function and on the application of those tools to global profiling for predictive, personalized cancer diagnosis and prognosis. His research bridges the interface between experimental studies and analytic computational challenges.

Dr. Mumenthaler
Shannon Mumenthaler
(323) 442-2529 - Office
(323) 442-2531 - Fax
smumenth@usc.edu

Shannon Mumenthaler
Dr. Mumenthaler is an Assistant Professor of Research Medicine at the CAMM. She received a B.S. in Genetics from UC Davis and a Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Pathology from UCLA. Although her primary scientific training is in cell biology, Dr. Mumenthaler applies a unique multidisciplinary approach toward her research program, partnering with mathematicians, clinicians, and engineers to explore critical areas in cancer. Her current research interests focus on the development of tools to better understand the evolutionary dynamics of tumor progression and drug resistance with specific investigations into the influence of microenvironmental selective pressures on tumor cell behavior. Toward this goal, Dr. Mumenthaler is closely collaborating with mathematical modelers to combine novel computational platforms with diverse experimental measurements to test and refine biological hypotheses and make clinically relevant predictions.

Dan Ruderman
Daniel Ruderman
(323) 442-2839 - Office
(323) 442-2764 - Fax
Ruderman@usc.edu

Daniel Ruderman
Dan Ruderman received his doctorate in theoretical physics from the University of California at Berkeley, followed by postdoctoral research at Cambridge University, USC, and the Salk Institute. Dr. Ruderman continued his scientific research in the industrial setting, first in solid tumor target discovery through integrative genomics at Berlex Biosciences, and then in proteomic biomarker discovery at Applied Minds. He was Founding Scientist at Applied Proteomics, a biomarker company spun out from Applied Minds in 2007. Dr. Ruderman joined CAMM in 2011, where his research focuses on signaling dynamics in cancer cells and systems biology interpretations of high-dimensional cancer assays, such as gene expression, proteomics, and autoantibodies.

University of Southern California University of Southern California