Rohit Varma is seen Oct. 16 during the “Best of Anterior Segment Society Meeting” at the American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting, held Oct. 14-18 in Chicago. Varma gave a talk, titled “An Ab-interno Gelatin Stent for the treatment of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: 3 Year Follow Up.”

Rohit Varma is seen Oct. 16 during the “Best of Anterior Segment Society Meeting” at the American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting, held Oct. 14-18 in Chicago. Varma gave a talk, titled “An Ab-interno Gelatin Stent for the treatment of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: 3 Year Follow Up.”

Rohit Varma, MD, MPH, interim dean of the Keck School of Medicine of USC and director of the USC Gayle and Edward Roski Eye Institute, received the Life Achievement Honor Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO).

The AAO, which held its annual meeting Oct. 14-18 in Chicago, presents the award to recognize “contributions to the Academy, its scientific and educational programs, and to the advancement of ophthalmology.” In a letter announcing the award, the AAO states that Varma’s “contributions have been instrumental in supporting the Academy’s mission to protect sight and empower lives.”

Eighteen medical and scientific experts from the USC Roski Eye Institute presented breakthrough research and clinical innovations at the AAO annual meeting, highlighting the most advanced treatments and procedures that focus on the future eye health of Americans across the lifespan. They covered a wide range of topics addressing ophthalmic issues — refractive surgery and the latest in the FDA-approved corneal cross-linking; pediatric glaucoma and retina; neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD); uveitis and scleritis, oculofacial plastic and cosmetic surgical techniques; hyperspectral imaging; vitreoretinal surgery; and a case study on pseudotumor cerebi.

“For more than 40 years our mission has been to preserve, protect and restore sight for the more than 26 million Americans over age 40 impacted by vision impairment as well as millions of children and young adults affected by myopia, amblyopia, strabismus, ptosis and other vision conditions,” Varma said. “In their AAO presentations this year, our faculty showcased their groundbreaking research in complex eye diseases and the latest treatments that will help end blindness and restore sight in our patients.”